‘Killers’ invade: Indonesian-Japanese co-produced film added to Japan CUTS 2014 lineup

Already diverse and eclectic, the 2014 Japan CUTS film festival in New York City (which begins July 10th through the 20th) has recently added the psychological-thriller Killers to its lineup.

Co-produced by Japanese film studio Nikkatsu and the Indonesian Guerilla Merah-Films, Killers follows the exploits of a Japanese serial killer named Nomura (played by Kazuki Kitamura) who uploads footage of his tortures and murders onto the internet. Nomura’s snuff films fascinate an Indonesian journalist named Bayu (played by Oka Antara), who in turn begins to kill and upload his murderous acts onto the internet as well. Nomura soon becomes aware of Bayu’s work, leading to a dark and twisted confrontation between both men.

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Japan CUTS 2014 unsheathes a lineup of cutting edge films

 

Photo courtesy of 2013 “Why Don’t You Play in Hell?” film partners

Photo courtesy of 2013 “Why Don’t You Play in Hell?” film partners

Fans of Japanese film, clear your schedules for July 10-20 as you’ll undoubtedly want to attend the 8th annual Japan CUTS film festival held at the Japan Society in New York City.

For 10 days, the Japan Society will become a mecca for Japanese cinephiles as the Japan CUTS 2014 festival will screen 27 films from the Land of the Rising Sun – including works by such notable Japanese directors as Sion Sono, Takashi Miike, Katsuhito Ishii and Hideo Nakata.

Though often difficult to assemble, Programmer for Japan CUTS 2014 Joel Neville Anderson stressed the importance of having a diverse collection of films presented at the festival.

“Curating festivals of a national cinema is necessarily problematic, swinging between exhaustive cultural surveys or limited selections of titles with international arthouse appeal, between a lineup that is representative and one that is exceptional,” Anderson said in a press release issued by Japan Society.

Anderson said the “tactic” at Japan CUTS has always been to place a heavy emphasis on “diversity” in the films they curate.

“This is especially so this year,” he said.

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Takashi Miike + Tom Hardy = ‘The Outsider’

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Oh wow…

Oh wow, indeed.

The magnificent English actor Tom Hardy (The Dark Knight Rises, Bronson, Inception, The Warrior and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) and controversial Japanese director Takashi Miike (the director of such great Japanese films such as : Audition, The Bird People of China, Ichi the Killer, The Great Yokai War and 13 Assassins) are rumored to be teaming up for the film The Outsider. 

Taking place in the aftermath of WWII, The Outsider tells the story of an American G.I. who, after becoming an American prisoner of war, later works his way up into the ranks of the Yakuza (the Japanese version of organized crime).

How can the prospect of such a film not send shivers up the spines of film enthusiasts?

Hardy, when need be, can easily play the role of a lovable and menacing brute, (Bane from The Dark Knight Rises) is in talks to be directed by one of the best cinematic agitators of all time, Takashi Miike.

Based on an original story idea by John Linson (Executive Producer of Sons of Anarchy), The Outsider was scripted by Andrew Baldwin.

Please leave your comments below as I’d love to hear people’s opinions on this film!

News: The Independent Film Festival Boston winners have been announced

Photo courtesy of iffboston.com

Photo courtesy of iffboston.com

 

 

 

 

 

The winners of the 2013 Independent Film Festival Boston have been announced in an official press release given by the festival:

The 2013 Independent Film Festival Boston (IFFBoston) came to a close on Tuesday night, April 30th, with a screening of the film IN A WORLD…with writer/director/star Lake Bell in attendance. Roughly 100 guest filmmakers, celebrities, and special guests were in attendance at the festival including new festival Creative Advisor Casey Affleck, actor Fran Kranz, director Bobcat Goldthwait, director James Ponsoldt, Writer/Actor/Director Lake Bell, Governor Deval Patrick, First Lady Diane Patrick and numerous others. Films were shown in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville over a total of 9 screens. This was the festival’s 11th year.

The jury and audience award prizes have been announced and are as follows:

Narrative Feature:
Grand Jury Prize Winner: THIS IS MARTIN BONNER directed by Chad Hartigan
Special Jury Prize Winner: HOUSTON directed by Bastian Gunther
Audience Award Winner: MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING directed by Joss Whedon

Documentary Feature:
Grand Jury Prize Winner: DIRTY WARS directed by Richard Rowley
Special Jury Prize Winner: REMOTE AREA MEDICAL directed by Jeff Reichert & Farihah Zaman
Audience Award Winner: BEST KEPT SECRET directed by Samantha Buck
Karen Schmeer Award for Excellence in Documentary Editing: Francisco Bello for OUR NIXON

Short Film:
Grand Jury Prize Winner: THE LAST ICE MERCHANT directed by Sandy Patch
Special Jury Prize Winner: SLOMO directed by Joshua Izenberg
Audience Award Winner: WORLD FAIR directed by Amanda Murray

The Narrative Feature Jury was comprised of. Writer/director/actor Jonathan Lisecki, actress Kate Lynn Sheil, and propmaster David Gulick. The Documentary Feature Jury was comprised of Ben Fowlie (Camden International Film Festival/ The DocYard), Rebecca Richman Cohen (War Don Don, Code of the West), and Tim Cawley (From Nothing, Something). The Short Film Jury was comprised of filmmaker Kris Avedisian (Donald Cried), professor Zak Lee (Fitchburg State University), and writer/director Jody Lambert (Of All The Things, People Like Us).

Prizes included a a $500 cash prize from the Karen Schmeer Editing Fellowship (goes to Francisco Bello, OUR NIXON) and a choice of two of the following: HDCam, Blu-Ray for Projection, or DCP from Modulus Studios (goes to Sandy Patch, THE LAST ICE MERCHANT).

More information on the festival will be available shortly on the festival website at http://www.iffboston.org.

Why We Watch: A Lost in the Miso Exclusive (Part 2) – An interview with Genkinahito’s Jason M.

I begin my series of Why We Watch interviews with Jason M. from Genkinahito.

Jason, a blogger since 2009, tells of how he first get a taste for foreign films (spoiler: a heaping helping of Hong Kong Jackie Chan films and the diverse programming on UK television gave him the bug for global cinema) and what, in his opinion, are the best foreign film distribution companies at the moment. Jason also gives his opinion on the ethics of fan subtitled movies and whether he thinks his studying of the Japanese language has helped him understand Japanese films on a deeper level.

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Why We Watch: A Lost in the Miso Exclusive (Part 1)

Lost in the Miso exclusive: Film bloggers talk about their love of Japanese and other foreign film, the difficulties of pursuing a foreign film hobby and why they blog about it. Due to the sheer size of this content, I’ll be breaking it up into parts.

Why We Watch: Part 1
I always wanted to blog. For several years I mulled over the idea of making one, eventually I grew content just reading and enjoying other people’s blogs. “I’ll get to it eventually,” I told myself.

Fast forward to May 2013, and life’s a lot different. As part of a college assignment for a Writing for Online and Social Media class, I have had to create and maintain a blog for the last several months. When I first discovered my classmates and I would have to create a blog and integrate it with other social media sites, e.g. Twitter and SoundCloud, I was a bit stressed. What was I going to write about?!

Thankfully, I did not anguish over a topic for my blog for very long. My professor, a fellow blogger, gave our class the obvious answer: write about what you love.

So that’s pretty much how Lost in the Miso was birthed into existence. I love foreign and independent film, with an emphasis on Japanese cinema. So why the hell wouldn’t I write about it?

And I’m so glad that I have. I’ve done some really fun things for this blog: I have attended a film festival where I was able to interview a film director, trekked into Boston during a snowstorm to see an independent film so I could write a review for it, discovered how painless SoundCloud is to use and, most importantly, I’ve networked with several really passionate and helpful film bloggers.

I reached out to several foreign film bloggers, via email, to ascertain why they blog about this stuff: the wonderfully knowledgeable Jason M. from Genkinahito (he knows his Japanese films!) and three great guys from S.C.U.M. Cinema: Monkey Fist, Mountain Monkey and Topo Sanchez (don’t let their names fool you, these are three very courteous and humble guys!)

A fascinating thing about these two blogs is that they originate from two different parts of the world: The United Kingdom and Singapore. It became quite clear early on into my research on foreign film bloggers that a love and interest in exotic cinema is not exclusive to any particular region in the world. People from all around the world are inherently curious about other cultures. Art (film, literature, television and music) is a universal language and, no matter how different another culture’s customs may seem, it is imbued with certain similar characteristics that make it more palatable for the foreigners who seek to consume it.

In Part 2 of this Lost in the Miso exclusive, Why We Watch, I’ll interview Genkinahito blogger, Jason M., who discusses how he developed an interest in foreign film, how he goes about finding foreign films to blog (it’s not always easy, folks) and, most importantly, Jason M. tells us why he blogs on the topic.

Martin Scorsese’s ‘Silence’ to star Andrew Garfield and Ken Watanabe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s taken nearly twenty-years but Martin Scorsese’s passion project, a film adaptation of Japanese author Shusaku Endo’s novel Silence, has received funding and will begin filming in the summer of 2014.

Scorsese has landed the talented Andrew Garfield (The Amazing Spider-Man and Social Network) and Ken Watanabe (The Last Samurai and Inception) to lead.

Garfield will be playing Father Rodrigues, a Portuguese Jesuit priest – a role that, during the adaptations many false starts, was rumored to be played by Daniel Day-Lewis and Benicio Del Toro.

Silence tells the story of two 17th-century Jesuit priests, one of whom is Father Rodrigues, who journey to Japan during a time where Japanese Catholics and European priests faced great religious persecution.

Ken Watanabe will be playing the role of an interpreter to the two Jesuit priests.

The majority of the film will be in the Japanese language, Scorsese has said.

Source: Variety

Images of Hayao Miyazaki’s ‘Kaze Tachinu’ have hit the web!

Legendary animation director Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke) is getting ready to release his first film in five years (his last being 2008’s ridiculously wonderful Ponyo) and we’ve got three images from the film to prove it!

While I’m not blown away by the images, you can’t go wrong with anything Studio Ghibli puts out and the film’s story sounds promising.

Based on a manga by the same name, Kaze Tachinu tells a fictionalized biography of Jirō Horikoshi, the real life designer of the World War II aircraft fighter jet the Mitsubishi A6M Zero. 

The other two images of Kaze Tachinu are below:

Kaze Tachinu (aka The Wind Rises) will open in Japan on July 20, 2013 and a trailer is expected soon.