‘Ghost in the Shell’ Review: Controversy and mediocrity haunt this hollow anime adapation

All style and no substance, Hollywood’s superfluous remake of a cerebral anime classic fails to quell valid concerns of whitewashing.

Created in 1989 by writer/artist Masamune Shirow, Ghost in the Shell was a popular cyberpunk manga which has spawned countless media adaptations, ranging from video games, animated television series and feature-length films. Though the different incarnations of the Ghost in the Shell property have varied in tone and story, one constant has always remained – protagonist Major Motoko Kusanagi. Deadly as she is beautiful, this Japanese cyborg law enforcement agent who commands a counter cyberterrorism task force was ripe with big-budgeted Hollywood potential.

Well, in theory at least.

A live-action adaptation of Ghost in the Shell certainly had all the makings of being a critical and commercial success – myriad action sequences, timely philosophical themes, a visually arresting setting and a compelling ass-kicking female leading character. Instead, the 2017 Rupert Sander’s directed Ghost in the Shell serves as a sad – albeit pretty to look at – reminder of Hollywood’s disgraceful tradition of marginalizing Asians and Asian-Americans.

(Warning: Spoilers below)

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‘Power Rangers’ Review: A surprisingly mighty morphing reboot that finds its power in diversity

The 90’s reboot no one wanted is an unexpected near triumph where diverse characters with heart overshadow big robots and bland action. 

At about an hour into viewing Power Rangersthe Dean Israelite-directed reboot of the 90’s children’s show of the same name, the realization that the film is not the heartless cash grab you braced yourself for begins to sink in. 

It’s true. At the halfway mark of Power Rangers, only one of the film’s five superheroes has even donned a cool, colorful costume and it’s only for the briefest of moments. Instead, the five teenagers with attitude sit around a campfire, unsure how to reconcile their differences while being thrust into a team together. Battered and bruised from failing in their warrior training, the rangers put aside their frustrations and begin to open up to one another emotionally, discovering about each other what we the audience have known all along – they are hurt and lonely.

They need friendship.

They also really need their mighty morphing powers, as an evil blast from the past named Rita Repulsa (played by Elizabeth Banks) has awoken with Earth-destroying intentions.

(Warning: Spoilers below)

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‘Deadpool’ Review: Marvel’s Merc with a Mouth stars in middling superhero comedy

After having accumulated an unsuspected and mind-blowing worldwide box office total of over $300 million in five days, nearly everyone has seen the latest and arguably most divisive superhero film to date – Deadpool.

If you are one of the few who have yet to see the film – get outside your cave and catch some sun, you agoraphobe – you have undoubtedly been told all about it. That the film is either the greatest superhero movie of all time or that it is among the most – if not the most – obnoxious comic book motion pictures of all time.

Well, since I care deeply about you and the hard-earned money you plunk down at your local cineplex, let’s get down to brass tacks – Deadpool lies somewhere in the middle of those wildly opposing views.

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‘Obvious Child’ Review: Raunch meets romance in this progressive abortion comedy

Rating: R

Length: 84 minutes

Director: Gillian Robespierre

Stars:

Donna – Jenny Slate

Jake Lacy – Max

Gabby Hoffman – Nellie

For a movie that is so clearly progressive in its premise, Obvious Child is also earnestly nostalgic for the good old days when love at first sight was something to be cherished and believed in. Obvious Child is a film that adeptly maneuvers itself through the controversial issue of abortion. It does so while existing within the stifling confines of a tired genre that is rife with cliches – the dreaded Rom-Com.

Undoubtedly, many Americans may find the premise to Obvious Child audacious and hard to swallow, as it is a comedy centered around a twenty-something female standup comic named Donna Stern (former Saturday Night Live member Jenny Slate) who discovers she is pregnant after a drunken, one night only sexual tryst with a young man named Max (Jack Lacy). Upon discovering her pregnancy, Donna, without any reservations, plans to terminate her pregnancy with an abortion.

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‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ Review: Marvel Studios wisely moves to a more mature territory

Captain America: The Winter Soldier,  Marvel Studios’ ninth cinematic installment, is the most grounded and faithful adaption of a superhero comic book to the big screen thus far.

Having been on a roll since 2008’s Iron Man, Marvel Studios has become this generation’s new Pixar insofar as the comic book-to-film studio has yet to release a critical or commercial dud since its inception.

Unfortunately for the naysaying cinephiles who have been chomping at the bit to cry foul at a Marvel Studios release, Captain America: The Winter Solider is not only a solid action film in its own right, but a fantastic universe-building addition to Marvel’s pantheon of interconnected films.

Partially inspired by the epic series of Captain America comic books written by Ed Brubaker entitled “The Winter Soldier,” the film begins months after the alien invasion of New York City seen in The Avengers, and features a more hardened and skeptical star-spangled avenger (Chris Evans).

Though still employed by the shadowy and omnipresent S.H.I.E.L.D. organization – think a global NSA, FBI and CIA – Captain America has begun to question the motives and orders of the group’s director Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). The film opens with a breathtaking action sequence where Captain America, per Fury’s order, performs a black-ops mission with the aid of Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) aboard a hijacked cruise liner.

This opening scene is an immediate punch to the gut for longtime Marvel Studios’ fans who may not be familiar with the Captain America found within the Marvel comic book. Though we’ve seen Steve Rogers, AKA Captain America, kill aliens in the movies, most viewers will be shocked to see the red, white and blue hero murder his enemies. In the opening sequence alone, we see Cap choke out, stab and smash the skulls of multiple foes.

In a spectacular fashion, Captain America: The Winter Solider dismantles the long-held belief that Fury and his S.H.I.E.L.D. organization can be trusted. Shortly after, movie-goers are introduced to Alexander Pierce (Robert Redford) who further plants seeds of doubt in the head of Captain American concerning Nick Fury. Compounding problems for our hero is the emergence of the mythical Soviet assassin turned real, the Winter Solider, who is relentless in preventing him from saving the day.

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BUFF15 Coverage: ‘Are We Not Cats’ Review

Photo Courtesy of www.xanderrobin.com

Photo Courtesy of http://www.xanderrobin.com

One of the highlights of the 15th annual Boston Underground Film Festival (BUFF15) this year was the short film Are We Not Cats.

Written, produced, directed and edited by Xander Robin, an up-and-comer from Brooklyn, New York, who graduated from Florida State University with a BFA in Motion Picture Arts, Are We Not Cats delighted the Brattle Theater audience it was screened before.

Xander makes great use of his 12 minute runtime and quickly sets up the films simple premise – a young couple are on a road trip when the young man (played by Michael Patrick) discovers his girlfriend (the beautiful Kelsea Dakota) has been compulsively eating his hair while he sleeps.

Patrick and Dakota work well together and the latter gives a daring performance that should be commended.

With such a short runtime, it’d be impossible to discuss what occurs within the film without spoiling the ending (and boy what an ending it is).

The final eight seconds of the film make the movie, a fact which Xander admits to in his interview with me (to be posted later). To give away this brilliantly quirky film’s ending would be a disservice to Xander and those who have yet to see it.

I wasn’t the only one who really dug this movie as it won “Director’s Choice Award for Short Film.”

This is a little movie with a big heart and it definitely stood out at this year’s festival.

‘Stoker’ Review: A near evil masterpiece

Rating: R
Length: 99 minutes
Director: Park Chan-wook

Stars:
India Stoker: Mia Wasikowska
Charlie Stoker – Matthew Goode
Evelyn Stoker – Nicole Kidman

Korean filmmaker Park Chan-wook’s English-language debut Stoker is somewhat of an odd duck. As a meditation on the inherent evil that resides in all of us – how this seed of evil can be nurtured and encouraged by another – Stoker is a beautifully macabre experience, filled with rich imagery and symbolism that make it a worthy addition to the pantheon of Chan-wook’s films (e.g. Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, Lady Vengeance and I’m a Cyborg, But That’s OK). Unfortunately, Stoker’s script (written by former Prison Break star Wentworth Miller) often works against the films powerful visual storytelling, undermining it with several predictable revelations and some odd characterizations that will compromise the suspension of disbelief of many of its audience.

Evil is a common theme found throughout Chan-wook’s filmography and no where is it more prevalent than in Stoker. There are multiple murders committed throughout the film and they are often ghastly. With one exception, none of the killings are done in self-defense – they are lustful executions. One female character masturbates in a shower, reliving the image of a young man’s neck being snapped with a belt. Many viewers of the film will find this too appalling and off-putting to be able to see the larger message that Chan-wook is attempting to convey about the seeds of evil that can blossom in all of us.

The story focuses on Mia Wasikowska’s character, 18-year old India Stoker, a meek and sheltered young woman with porcelain skin, who is grieving the loss of her father, Richard (played in flashbacks by Dermot Mulroney), who was just killed in a mysterious automobile accident. Richard’s death prompts a visit from his brother Charlie, an uncle India never knew existed. Very quickly the family’s world is turned upside down as Charlie moves in and begins seducing both India and her emotionally unbalanced mother, Evelyn (Nicole Kidman who gives an great, icy performance).

As we get to know more about Charlie – he has just returned from a lengthy European business trip, he informs the family – we can immediately sense something is not quite right about him. Early on in the film, the loyal housemaid, Mrs. McGarrick, is seen shouting at Charlie, clearly not happy to see him return and inect himself into the Stoker family dynamics. Later, Charlie’s Aunt Gina visits and attempts to warn the mother and daughter about their new housemate.

It becomes quite evident early on it’s India who Charlie is ultimately trying to seduce. He sees an evilness inside of her that resembles his own and uses his good looks and charm to bring about a sexual and murderous awakening in his niece. Charlie begins to ensnare India in his violent web, making her complicit in his murderous actions and, you know what? India seems to love every minute of it.

As mentioned earlier, the main problem with Stoker is its script. Chan-wook does a wonderful job ratcheting up the suspense at all the right moments, masterfully juggling several taut and suspenseful intercutting scenes that all build into a crazed, blood-soaked crescendo. However, the big reveals are never that shocking, most are predictable, and no matter how damn good Chan-wook is at building up to the film’s payoff scenes (and he is that damn good), they are, in effect, flaccid and lacking the punch needed in a psychological thriller like this because the script shows most of its cards to soon.

It’s because of this that Stoker works best as a symbolic visual representation of how evil is attracted to evil – how the evil in all of us can be brought to the surface by the most unlikeliest of sources. Unfortunately, because of its script, Stoker never quite reaches the heights that it should, given its exceptionally talented cast and director, but despite all this, one cannot walk away from this film and not have a visceral reaction – which is something all quality art should evoke.

‘Battle Royale’ Review: Opening up a whole new world, one arterial spray of blood at a time

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I’ve always have had a soft spot for Battle Royale.

Growing up, I was never all that fascinated with Japan’s entertainment exports (with the exception of PlayStation and Nintendo). It all seemed so fluffy and cutesy; art devoid of any meaning or message. What was a 17 year-old supposed to take away from seeing yellow stuffed animals hurling lightning bolts at turtles (Pokemon) and masked, rainbow-colored martial artists exchanging punches and kicks with monsters whose customs were made of foam and rubber (Power Rangers)?

My ignorant disdain towards Japanese entertainment came to an abrupt end my senior year of high school. Bedridden with hellacious bouts of both strep throat and the flu, my mother asked if there were a couple of books I’d like her to pick up for me at Barnes and Noble. I immediately requested The Man in the High School by Philip K. Dick, which began a long love affair with the late author, and then proceeded to rack my brain over the choice for a second book.

Then it hit me like a bolt of lightning thrown by that obnoxious yellow Pokemon: wasn’t there some Japanese film I kept reading about online that couldn’t land an American distribution deal due to its graphic subject matter? High school kids running around an island with an array of weapons killing each other? And wasn’t it based on a novel? One quick search on a laptop yielded the results I was hoping for: yes, there was such a book and, yes, there was an English translation version and, yes, it was in stock at Barnes and Noble.

“Mom, I’d like you to also grab me Battle Royale by Koushun Takami,” I said.

I can’t remember how my mother responded to that request, I’m sure her head almost exploded at the daunting task of having to remember the name Koushun Takami. Somehow someway, god love her, my mother was able to obtain me a copy of the book that would change my life.

I fondly recall being sick as a dog, plowing through the 666 pages of death, maiming and acts of heroism that were contained within Takami’s book. Reading and enjoying a story about student-on-student murder seemed taboo to me in a post-Columbine world and I was struck by the realization that such a work could never be spawned within the 50 states of America. A country, my country, that continues to find itself plagued by random acts of violence throughout its school systems. No, it’s safe to say if Battle Royale were to have been created in the States it would have been cripplingly self-conscious and unsuccessful or if it were successful it’d be a watered-down, bloodless soap-opera *cough*The Hunger Games*cough*.

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Soon enough my illnesses abated but my adoration for this quirky Japanese novel stayed. I began the arduous task of procuring a DVD copy of Battle Royale. Eventually, I was able to obtain a burned copy of the film, a Chinatown knock off – complete with not so great subtitles and poor picture quality.

Battle Royale the film, directed by legendary Japanese film director Kinji Fukasaku in 2000, was released a full year after the novel was published and never quite reaches the heights of its source material. However, it does a superb job of juggling a large cast of, at its time, Japan’s finest young actors and actresses. The movie only falters when it begins to deviate from the storyline of the book which, thankfully, does not happen too frequently.

The movie still has the same dystopian setting, where Japan is a member of the fictitious totalitarian regime The Republic of Greater East Asia. The alternate reality Japan has seen its economy plummet. 15% of the nation are unemployed leading to students boycotting school. Over 800,000 students walk out of their classes, we’re told at the beginning of the film. When crime rates involving children and teenagers begin to skyrocket the government enacts the Millennium Educational Reform Act (a.k.a. The Battle Royale Act) due to the growing fear and distrust the adult population has for its youth. The BR Act is meant to terrorize Japan’s children and teens, to arouse suspicion in one another thus making it impossible for the youth to galvanize and thwart the corrupt government.

Every year, one classroom (in the novel 50 classes participated every year) is chosen to partake in the Battle Royale event located on an abandoned island. In the film, it’s the forty unlucky students from Class 3-B that have been chosen at random to compete. It’s horrifying to watch a class of students be informed that they will have to slaughter every last one of their fellow students if they hope to leave the island with their life.

Legendary Japanese actor and director Takeshi “Beat” Kitano is sublime as the evil ex-teacher who is running the Battle Royale event. He wastes no time in letting his former students know how seriously he is taking the BR act when he presents to the class the dead body of their teacher and later plunges a knife into the forehead of female student, Fujiyoshi.

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As the movie continues we see 37 out of the 40 students killed, some off camera, in the most grotesque ways possible. What saves this movie from becoming nauseating to watch is the decision by scriptwriter Kenta Fukasaku (the son of the director) to instill black humor into the story. Clearly defined heroes and villains (those that try to fight back against the government and those who mercilessly execute their fellow students) also prevent the movie from becoming too soul-upsetting.

Kinji Fukasaku’s expert handling of the actions scenes, and gore they result in, should be applauded. One never thinks of cartoonish, over-the-top arterial blood spray as tasteful, and yet it was the least gratuitous of options for this film. Had Fukasaku gone the other way, and tried to make each death as realistic as possible, well, this would have been an entirely different movie and far too unsettling. Similar bloodshed can be seen in the movies Kill Bill and Django Unchained. Is it any surprise that director Quentin Tarantino has gone on record saying Battle Royale is his favorite movie since 1992?

Those who have not seen Battle Royale, I implore you to do so. It is much easier today to find a copy of the movie than when I first did in 2005. It’s available on Netflix and available for purchase at Amazon. I would however, recommend you read the book before viewing the movie but I understand most people will be unwilling to do this.

Battle Royale opened the Japanese cinema and entertainment floodgates for me. Had I not read the book and seen the film I doubt I’d would ever have discovered the cinematic works of Akira Kurosawa, Takashii Miike, Sion Sono, Katsuhito Ishii and Hayao Miyazaki. I’d perhaps never have discovered Japanese authors such as Haruki Murakami, Kenzaburo Oe and Ryu Murakami. I probably would never have discovered the great films South Korea is putting out, such as Park Chan-Wook’s Vengeance Trilogy. I found “Battle Royale” at the right place at the right time and it redirected my taste in film, literature and foreign cultures.

No easy feat, right?