Apocalypse Now: The back-story to ‘Snowpiercer’ has been revealed in an animated short

Just how did the passengers of the Snowpiercer – a colossal train that never stops running – wind-up aboard their new home? Well, according to the animated prequel to Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer that has recently surfaced online, they fought tooth and nail to procure their seats.

With a visual storytelling style similar to that of a motion comic, the 4-minute animated prequel does a serviceable job in succinctly telling the back-story to the upcoming dystopian film (it opens in South Korea on August 1), and will give those who view it a better understanding of the film’s world.

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Behind the scenes footage of Bong Joon-ho’s ‘Snowpiercer’

It’s been a long time coming but images and footage from Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer are starting to make their way onto the web.

Unfortunately, the video is only in Korean but it gives us a pretty good look at some intense scenes: a mutiny occurring on the Snowpiercer train and a breathtaking shot of the train itself beginning to lift off of the tracks while in motion.

Grimy and gloomy, this Sci-Fi film looks incredible. It’s hard not to get excited about a movie that is not only being directed by the great Bong Joon-ho (who also directed Mother and The Host) but stars an impressive ensemble cast: Chris Evans, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris, John Hurt, Song Kang-ho and Octavia Spencer.

The film, based on a French graphic novel entitled Le Transperceneige, takes place in a post-apocalyptic setting where Earth has been ravaged by global warming which triggered a new Ice Age. The only remaining members of the human race are stuck on board a train called The Snow Piercer. Very quickly a class system begins to develop on the train which sparks a rebellion.

The teaser footage says the film will be released “Summer 2013” so we should be seeing a proper first trailer sometime in the very near future.

Source: Twitchfilm

The 2013 Korean Cinematic Invasion

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No one can deny the groundbreaking cinema which has been coming out of South Korea for over the last ten years. Korean films such as A Tale of Two Sisters, Oldboy and The Host have amassed dedicated cult followings worldwide.

So it was only a matter of time before some of the biggest directors in South Korea’s New Wave of Cinema – chief among them being Kim Jee-woon, Park Chan-wook and Bong Joon-ho – would wash up on US shores, Hollywood beckoning them to showcase their skills on the largest stage in the world.

Years from now, there is a chance 2013 could be looked back upon as the year of the Korean Cinematic Invasion of the United States, with not one, not two, but three English language directorial debuts by Korean filmmakers.

However, this movement has gotten off to a rocky start.


Kim Jee-woon’s ‘The Last Stand’

The Last Stand - Photo Courtesy of www.thelaststandfilm.com

This January, director Kim Jee-woon released the R-rated action movie, The Last Stand, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger (who hadn’t starred in a leading role for almost a decade). The critical response to the film was mixed (it currently sits at a “rotten” rating of 59%, just one percentage point from being considered “fresh,” on film review aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes) and it was a flat-out bomb commercially. According to the website Boxofficemojo, The Last Stand yielded a disappointing $12 million in the United States. With a production budget of around $45 million, it was considered a colossal failure considering it was expected to usher in a new era of Schwarzenegger films.

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